Category Archives: MDGs


Kenyan leaders seem to have a very hostile relationship with the country’s prosperity. They constantly and very determinedly refuse to let us, as a nation, prosper. They have honed their “turn non-issues into issues” skills so well that it’s almost amazing. Almost. They are too busy dodging the country’s pertinent challenges by proposing/passing laws that are so life unchanging it should be a crime.

Last week, members of parliament proposed a law that would result in people being jailed for a year or paying Kshs 2 million for failing to refer to MPs as “Honorable” when addressing them. Yes, you read it correctly…jail time or fine for not referring to an MP as  H.O.N.O.R.A.B.L.E! I understand the title but is it really necessary…especially given the fact that there is very little that is honorable about these MPs!? If you have to threaten Kenyans with punishment/fines so that they can refer to you as “Honorable” then maybe you should question why we are not inclined to refer to you as such to begin with.

According to the MPs, “the principle purpose of this Bill is to promote the good image of the country, foster orderliness, discipline and decorum in the process of governance.” When did having titles promote the image of a country!? If that is the case then we should all get titles. Instant boost to Kenya’s image right there! And orderliness!? Where is this that they are looking for orderliness? If it is at state functions then orderliness will be achieved through proper planning, coordination and execution. Titles are not going to do that for you.  Discipline and decorum in the process of governance!? Say what now!? Titles can make that happen!? Well, we have a president and deputy president that we refer to as such all the time but that hasn’t done anything for us on the governance front, dear MPs. How do you explain that!? Referring to you as member of parliament so and so hasn’t worked out well in that department for us either. MP is a title too no!? Or doesn’t it have the magic that the titles you are proposing have!?

“The Bill also proposes a hierarchy for State officials according to seniority. The ranking of the public officials will see MPs placed higher than governors, Supreme Court judges, former Presidents and Vice-Presidents.” In short, the MPs basically want to feel more superior than other public officials. What is that feeling of superiority going to do for you MPs!? Will it make you better leaders!? Will it ensure that you will play a pivotal role in attainment of the MDGs!? What is this silent fight that you seem to have, especially with governors, all about!? Why are you forcing the rest of us to join your ego trip!?

Dear MPs,

If you really want to foster orderliness, discipline and decorum in the process of governance then simply act right. Be disciplined individually as well as collectively and fulfill the promises that you made to your constituents. It wouldn’t hurt to take your responsibilities seriously instead of making a mockery out of the people who voted you in believing that you would make a difference. There can only be as much order as you want there to be. You are the leaders, you set the pace, you set the tone. Surround yourselves with people, and also be people, who are invested in making a positive impact on Kenyan communities, and all these things will fall into place. You want to be chaotic and then claim that a title will foster orderliness, discipline and decorum!? How now!?

As for promoting the country’s image, well, you can do that by acting right, as mentioned above. Also, tackling the issues that we as a country are facing. Focus your energies on addressing insecurity, corruption, poor education, lack of health care amenities, underdeveloped transport systems, poaching, inconsistent electricity and water supply, among others. If properly addressed, these are some of the things that will boost our country’s image not titles!

Try and get it together quick please.


A Kenyan.


Greatness from Kenya

I have been thinking about the positive in Kenya of late. There seems to be a lot going wrong (or not going anywhere at all) in our beloved country. For the past few days I have been telling myself that at least once a week I should highlight some of Kenya’s positive happenings. The universe heard me and decided to hold me to my word. In the past few hours a friend linked me up with two news articles of what I call greatness from Kenya.

The first one is Pumzi – a short SciFi  film written and directed by award-winning Wanuri Kahiu that was screened at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival. Yes, I know, it’s 2014 and I just heard about the film…better late than never! Pumzi imagines a post-WWIII (The Water War) Africa where there is no water and people live locked away in contained communities.  Watch Pumzi below.

Here is an interview that Wanuri Kahiu gave on “Africa and Science Fiction.” Listen carefully for it is full of gems.

CNN also did a feature on Wanuri Kahiu where she talks about her filmmaking journey. Read it here. She has worked on other projects including From a Whisper, Ger: To Be Seperate, Just A Band and State House, among others. 

The second one is news of Captain Irene Koki Mutungi becoming the first black female Boeing 787 captain in the world. Here’s to attaining her sky dreams in a Dreamliner! Captain Mutungi was also the first female pilot at Kenya Airways. Talk about showing all Kenyan girls who desire to be pilots that their dreams are valid.  She has truly opened many a doors not only for them but also for those of us who aspire to work in fields that have traditionally been male-dominated.

Below is an image of Captain Mutungi and here is a feature on her.


Today we celebrate Wanuri Kahiu and Irene Koki Mutungi, two phenomenal women who are lighting the path for the rest of us. They have and continue to show that it can be done. We are the authors of our own stories and the captains of our own lives.


#Digital #Security #In #Kenya

When they told us that it would be a digital government, the dynamic duo was not joking. Other than retweeting praises pelted at it by superfans, the Kenyan government has become the king of #hashtags. Nowhere is this more evident than in the security of our nation. Security in Kenya has officially gone digital, people! Hashtag it and they will get the illusion that we are actually doing something about (in)security seems to be the motto.

Last week, the president gave his first State of the Nation address in which he stated that the government had launched two major new security programs. One of these is the Nyumba Kumi Initiative, a community policing program geared towards ensuring that communities participate in their security matters, or #NyumbaKumi. Public participation is important in any society. However, I find it curious that the president considers the initiative a major security program. Getting residents to discuss their security challenges and share these concerns with the police is great. But, does it really count as a security program especially if the police, which happens in most cases, don’t do anything with the information? The police in Kenya, as we have come to realize over the years, are ill-equipped, poorly trained and simply unresponsive. Mr. President, we can talk our heads off about insecurity and obsessively share information with the can’t-be-bothered police but does that really a security program make!?

A cursory look at #NyumbaKumi on Twitter shows that it has become a hashtag space for anything ranging from jokes to finger-pointing to genuine concerns about its practicality and efficacy. The government and its don’t-you-dare-criticize-jubilee-because-they-can-do-no-wrong staunch believers continue to promote #NyumbaKumi as the light at the end of the insecurity tunnel. You know what they say about that light though – it could be an oncoming train.

Not to be stopped there, there is now #UsalamaWatch. This hashtag, according to the official government of Kenya handle for reporting crime @UsalamaWatchKen, is meant to address issues of insecurity through allowing Kenyans to report suspicious activities directly to authorities online. Who monitors its feed and hashtag? Is it monitored 24/7 or just sometimes? What is the response time from initial reporting to police acting, if at all they do? Is there a procedure in place to authenticate the suspicious activities reports? How effective has #UsalamaWatch been? What happens in cases of emergencies? Are people expected to just tweet and cross their fingers that police will be dispatched immediately?

Then there is the Rapid Results Initiative, or #RRI/#RRI14, that the president launched in February. According to the official twitter handle @RRIKenya, the initiative is a method of gaining community input and decision-making on a focused topic in a short amount of time. A vague description if you ask me, but nobody’s is asking me…ha! As per its Facebook page, RRI as a strategy provides an opportunity to re-examine ourselves and to review our approach to security. Also on the FB page, the RRI also seeks to discuss the continued evolving cases of crime in the country and possible ways of eliminating them. The Official handle for the Ministry of Interior and Coordination of National Government in The Office of the President, @InteriorKE (sounds like a home design company but that is neither here nor there), tweeted that the RRI’s thematic areas are crime reduction, streamlining the process of issuance of national identification and travel documents. Hmmm shouldn’t these be handled by different departments? What does crime reduction have to do with streamlining the unnecessarily tedious ID and passport acquisition process? There also seems to be many a discussions about insecurity. What is being done with the information that comes out of these discussions? Are the voices of Kenyans even being heard? Or are they lost behind the hashtag Olympics that the government seems to have going on?

And of course you all know it would not be complete without #SecureKE which, according to @InteriorKE, should be used for immigration, police and issues affecting you which need to be addressed by the government of Kenya. Or basically what all the aforementioned hashtags are supposed to be used for.

Clearly this digital security is not working out for us. In the past month, gunmen attacked a church in Likoni killing four and injuring more than a dozen others. There are claims that police were informed of the impending attack but they didn’t act on that intelligence. This past Sunday a suspected suicide bomber died while assembling a bomb in Nairobi’s Eastleigh area. On Monday three explosions killed six people and injured dozens others. Today, Wednesday, bomb experts detonated an explosive device that had been buried outside a residential area near Eastleigh. Meanwhile the government stays pushing these hashtags like goody goody.

Dear Mr. President, we, as a nation, cannot hashtag our way out of the insecurity. You globetrotting isn’t going to do it either. Practical measures need to be taken to address insecurity.  Have we not learnt anything from Westgate? What will unresponsive, poorly trained and ill-equipped police officers do for us? How will a security force that seems to have no clue what to do with intelligence help us? What will the overzealous arrests of individuals accomplish? Isn’t your government creating a society that lives in fear of the police and neighbors? How are these hashtags going to change anything?


On Kenya and Digital Gone Awry

The president and his deputy branded themselves as the dynamic digital duo during the election campaign period. They promised us many a digital revolutions in the country. Digital government, digital classrooms, digital government offices and digital public services to name but a few. Turns out that digital government simply meant they (or their social media handlers) would tweet links to their speeches and retweet praises from their superfans. Any questions or criticisms directed to them on their social media channels are either ignored or dismissed.

The digital classrooms are yet to become a reality. The dynamic digital duo had promised that all students in class one throughout the country would get laptops. Last month, the tender for the supply of laptops was awarded to Olive Telecommunications Limited, an Indian company. According to the Daily Nation, the Education Cabinet Secretary said that the company quoted the lowest and most advantageous amount which saved the taxpayers Kshs 8 billion. The cabinet secretary said that they were confident that Olive Telecommunications would deliver. They had after all sent a team of government officials to assess where the laptops would be assembled. They had also seen a list of companies that Olive Telecommunications supplied laptops with. The cabinet secretary led us to believe that everything was perfect and the laptop project was finally ready to roll out.

But this is the Kenyan government after all a.k.a scandal central. Just this month, the Public Procurement Administrative Review Board ruled that Olive Telecommunications Pvt Limited did not win the tender fairly. As a result the board cancelled the tender and asked the Ministry of Education to undertake a fresh tender process. The tender required that the company that got it would be an Original Equipment Manufacturer. Turns out that Olive Telecommunications is not. How exactly did the cabinet secretary and his people miss this? They assessed the company supposedly right!? How did this fact escape them!? Also, Olive Telecommunications did not have the financial resources required in order to qualify. Guess the cabinet secretary and his folks were just going to find a way to sweep that fact under the rug. In December, Olive Telecommunications had offered to supply the tender at Kshs 23.2 billion. By the time they got the tender last month it was at Kshs 24.6 billion. A difference of Kshs 1.4 billion. Pray tell Mr. Cabinet Secretary, why the Kshs 1.4 billion increase!? Is it a hidden transaction fee!? A signing bonus!? A good-job-on-duping-the-Kenyans-again golden handshake!?

We can only hope that the next process will not be as flawed as this one. Although, last I checked, the cabinet secretary has said he is not resigning over this. So if it’s the same people handling the process again, we can only wait and see what antics they will pull…sigh.

Seems like digital government offices are also a rumor as shown by the gem below.


Really Lands Ministry!? A tender for TYPEWRITERS!? It’s 2014 and you are looking for typewriters!? Because why!? What can typewriters do that…I don’t know…say computers and tablets can’t!? I suppose they are the ideal portable device huh!? Are you just looking to collect antiques or what!? Are you planning to use them as decorative elements!? Oh wait…I got it…you are trying to create jobs for the youth…manufacturing typewriters right!?

Digital means different things to different people I guess.